Clinical/Front-line Sessions2019-03-20T02:10:38-04:00

Clinical/Front-line Sessions

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April 1st, 2019

A1: Racialized Populations and Mental Health Court Diversion

11:00am – 12:00pm

Stream:

Responding to the needs of diverse clients and communities, including concurrent disorders; trauma; the justice system; dual diagnosis and LGBTQ2

Description:

The Racialized Populations and Mental Health & Addictions Community of Interest (CoI) is a provincial forum for knowledge exchange and collaborative creation. Members of CoI will present on its most recent project which focused on the experiences of racialized persons with formal and informal mental health court diversion programs and practices in Toronto. 

The presentation aims to increase the understanding of how diversion is applied to racialized populations; raise awareness about the need for standardization of race-based data collection in the justice system and contribute to existing strategies to improve the overall well-being of racialized populations moving through justice system. It will also examine how perceptions of race in the justice system impact outcomes, as well as what is needed to effectively address systemic racial inequities.

Presenters:

Angela Yip, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)

Candace Vena and Christine Conrad, CMHA, Ontario

Deqa Farah, Mental Health and Addiction Housing First Programs at Fred Victor

Bios:

Angela Yip is a knowledge broker with a neuroscience background, located in the Toronto office with the Provincial System Support Program (PSSP) at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). She has worked for a number of years in health systems and services research and consulting and is currently focused on working with diverse stakeholders to put evidence into action.

Candace Vena currently works in the Policy Department at the Canadian Mental Health Association, Ontario and is the Network Coordinator for the Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee (HSJCC). Over the last 5 years, Candace has worked in a variety community based mental health and justice settings, including extensive work in domestic violence, mental health and addictions, community justice and reintegration and youth in the justice system.

Christine Conrad leads the justice portfolio at CMHA Ontario. Previously, she was program advisor to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and the former Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration. Christine was called to the bar of Ontario in 2016 after articling with Legal Aid Ontario in Moosonee. Christine graduated from Dalhousie University’s School of Law in Nova Scotia, her home province.

Deqa Farah is a Senior Manager, Mental Health and Addiction Housing First Programs at Fred Victor. Deqa has done extensive work in access, equity, anti-oppressive practice, mental health promotion and social justice. Deqa has been working with marginalized individuals over the past 17 years in the areas of: counselling, crisis intervention, facilitation of support groups as well as program co-ordination, research, planning and evaluation and leadership building.

A2: BounceBack: Championing Innovation and Culture-Competency through Quality Improvement

11:00am – 12:00pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs.

Description:

CMHA’s BounceBack Ontario team seeks to share their experience and learnings from their quality improvement journey; including developing best practices that champion innovation and cultural competency for mental health services. The BounceBack Ontario program received funding from the Ontario Government in 2017 to increase access to free psychotherapy services for Ontarians with mild to moderate depression. Through the service’s telephone coaching, workbooks and online videos available in multiple languages, the program has proven to reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety by 40% after completion.

BounceBack Ontario continuously looks to improve client-retention rates and develop cultural competency. Thanks to the Excellence through Quality Improvement Project (E-QIP) providing training on Quality Improvement (QI) methodology, the team gained tools and understanding of an effective, innovative approach that encourages evidence-based practice and thinking outside the box. This presentation will include some of these tools and strategies (PDSA cycle, 5-Whys (video), FUN change-idea-generating exercises), and the current progress/results with BounceBack’s project. Furthermore, the BounceBack program will share steps they have taken to support the development of cultural competency in service and staff through cross-cultural training and cultural forums.

Presenters:

Ashley Hogue, CMHA York and South Simcoe Branch

Hannah Matthews, CMHA, Ontario

BounceBack Coaches, Gregory Di Marino and Euodia Leung

Bios:

Ashley Hogue is the Director of Service for the BounceBack Ontario program at CMHA-York and South Simcoe with the responsibility for the operational expansion and implementation across the province. Previously, Ashley was the Senior Planner at the Central LHIN where she led mental health and addictions and specialized geriatric services planning and the implementation of the Ontario Comprehensive Mental Health and Addictions Strategy.

Hannah Matthews is a bilingual Stakeholder Engagement Coordinator for the BounceBack program with CMHA Ontario. Her role includes facilitating education and awareness on BounceBack throughout the province with diverse stakeholders including primary care providers, health organizations, and consumers.

Gregory Di Marino is an English speaking, Canadian born, and of Italian nationality Coach for the BounceBack program. He also, holds both dual Canadian and United States citizenship. He is a strong believer in individuals discovering their own resilience by trying to foster positive changes in their lives. He wants to continue to be an advocate for those who struggle with mental health and the stigmatization that is attached to it.

Euodia Leung is a Cantonese-speaking, Canadian-born Coach with the BounceBack program.  She has been in Quality Improvement projects for the program’s expansion over the last year.  When she isn’t working on her postgraduate studies, you’ll find her actively searching for innovative approaches for serving the diversity of the next generation.

A3: Case Management Wait Time Project

11:00am – 12:00pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

This Quality Improvement project focuses on reducing wait times for entry into case management using a LEAN Six Sigma approach for driving the change and improving the timely access of case management services. The project uses wait time data as well as voice of the customer data which was a tool used for client engagement.  It also uses an innovative team-based model to improve timeliness of services. 

CMHA Sudbury/Manitoulin is facing an escalating waitlist for entry into case management services. The goal of the project is to reduce wait times into case management from 695 days to 90 days by March 31, 2019.

Presenters:

Amad Ejaz and Sue Tasse
CMHA Sudbury/Manitoulin

Bios:

Ahmed Ejaz is the Quality Improvement Coordinator at CMHA Sudbury and is also an IDEAS facilitator with a master’s degree in healthcare   quality, risk and safety from Queen’s University. Ahmed has 4 years of experience in healthcare settings ranging from Acute care to Community. 

Sue Tasse is the Manager of Clinical Services at CMHA Sudbury/Manitoulin and has a wealth of experience working in the mental health sector. She is also a registered Psychotherapist and since 2016, has held the position of President of the Ontario Association of Consultants, Counsellors, Psychometrists and Psychotherapists.

B1: More Than Wishful Thinking: Strength-Based LEAN Six Sigma for Improving Access

1:00pm – 2:00pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Improving the quality of mental health and addictions services, including addressing issues around access has become vital to the sector. Due to this, organizations are increasingly focused on establishing continuous Quality Improvement (QI) frameworks or strategies. One popular and ever-growing approach to QI is the LEAN Six Sigma model. While it emphasizes value for the client, it does place an emphasis on problems which does not always resonate with many mental health clinicians whose treatment approaches are strengths-based.

This workshop will be showcasing a new approach, known as Strength-based LEAN Six Sigma. This strength-based alternative marries traditional models and tools with Appreciative Inquiry and Solution Focus principles. Participants will draw on their own experiences and experiment with one of the tools (the wishbone tool for success/cause analysis).

Presenters:

Ann Barber, Julie Breau and Kristina Rohde
Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health

Bios:

Ann Barber has worked within the mental health sector throughout her career, in both clinical and research capacities. She has been with the Centre since 2012 and has applied her knowledge and experience in evaluation and implementation science into her current role as a Quality Improvement Specialist. She has an M.A. in Psychology and is a Lean Black Belt candidate.

Julie Breau has been working with innovative organizations that bring together stakeholders to solve complex problems, through research and training. She has been with the Centre since 2014, working alongside CYMH service providers to implement and improve services. She has a M.A. in Political Science and is a Green Belt candidate.

Kristina Rohde blends her knowledge of quality improvement, research, and evaluation together on concrete projects that focus on access, service pathways, and engagement among others. She’s been with the CHEO organization for over 8 years and co-developed the Centre’s quality improvement program. She holds an M.A. in Criminology, is a Lean Black Belt candidate, and a credentialed evaluator.

B2: Integrated Youth Services: Re-organizing Community Supports for Ontario’s Young People

1:00pm – 2:00pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs.

Description:

To improve both access to and quality of mental health and addictions care for young people, adding new service providers is not always feasible or necessary. By establishing ‘one-stop-shop’ hubs that bring together existing services for mental health, substance use, primary care, and a range of social, educational, vocational and housing supports, and by ensuring that the intensity of interventions is matched to each young person’s level of need, Youth Wellness Hubs Ontario (YWHO) offers a sustainable approach to service improvement in resource-limited environments.

The YWHO model of integrated stepped care challenges agencies to rethink and reorganize the way they serve and engage clients, and the way they interact with organizations and families in their local communities.  This workshop will illustrate YWHO’s evidence-based model of service delivery, the way in which it is being implemented in ten sites across Ontario, as well as the expected benefits of the model for youth, for communities, and for Ontario’s mental health system.

Presenters:

Dr. Joanna Henderson and Shauna MacEachern
Youth Wellness Hubs Ontario

Bios:

Dr. Joanna Henderson is Executive Director of Youth Wellness Hubs Ontario and Director of the Margaret and Wallace McCain Centre for Child, Youth and Family Mental Health at the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health (CAMH).

Shauna MacEachern is the Project Manager for Youth Wellness Hubs Ontario and the Manager of Implementation for the Provincial System Support Program at the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health (CAMH).

B3: Excellence Through Quality Improvement Project (E-QIP): Responding to Aggressive/Violent Behaviour

1:00pm – 2:00pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Quality Improvement is meant to enhance the safety, efficiency and effectiveness of all activities within an organization by using various methods, both qualitative and quantitative. As healthcare delivery becomes more complex, there exists the need to explore methods to reduce costs while ensuring continuity of services to the community that is being served.

CMHA Durham has seen a significant increase in the number of complex individuals accessing services in the Durham Region. As a result, there have been growing numbers of clients presenting with aggressive/violent behaviours requiring third party assistance. The organization felt it necessary to take a proactive approach to mitigate risks by focusing on service delivery and needs for complex clients, specifically those exhibiting aggressive/violent behaviours, while ensuring the safety of clients, staff, and visitors of CMHA Durham. Participating with E-QIP allowed the organization to identify potential gaps and implement quality improvement initiatives to enhance client experience and safety that could be shared with the E-QIP Community of Practice.

Presenters:

Rina Short and  Kerrie Wriker
CMHA Durham

Bios:

Rina Short is the Quality Improvement and Risk Management Lead at the Canadian Mental Health Association Durham (CMHA Durham).  In addition to her work in quality improvement and risk management, she leads the organization in client safety and co-leads in the accreditation process. Rina works closely with all programs within CMHA Durham’s hub model to integrate key principles that ensure the delivery of safe, effective and efficient care and services to the community while maintaining a culture of continuous quality improvement.

Kerrie Wriker is the Coordinator for Clinical Programs and Services and has been working with CMHA Durham for 18 years. Kerrie started the agency as a front-line worker and has successfully moved into several management positions over the last 12 years. Kerrie’s ongoing project is co-leading the organization’s accreditation process. In 2016 CMHA Durham received Exemplary Standing and is now entering their 6th accreditation cycle.

Kerrie and Rina were awarded the CMHA Durham’s CEO award for outstanding leadership in September 2015.

B4: Lost and Sometimes Forgotten: Supporting LGBTQ2S Offenders

1:00pm – 2:00pm

Stream:

Responding to the needs of diverse clients and communities, including concurrent disorders; trauma; the justice system; dual diagnosis and LGBTQ2

Description:

This presentation will focus on LGBTQ2S offenders within the Correctional System in Canada. The workshop will highlight the work of Correctional Services and CMHA in providing support, services and opportunities to LGBTQ2S offenders while incarcerated and upon release.  This workshop will also speak about the re-integration work being done to assist LGBTQ2S offenders be supported in society upon release. The discussion in this workshop is open to explore and identify opportunities that can be assistive to increasing the mental health and well-being of our Trans identified and 2-spirit offender population.

Presenter:

Stacey Love-Jolicoeur, CMHA Halton Region Branch

Bio:

Stacey Love-Jolicoeur is an independent education/support worker for the LGBTQ2S community under contract with CMHA. Stacey provides LGBTQ2S services in nine correctional facilities throughout Ontario. She is the coordinator of the TRANSforum group in Belleville and is a member of the Belleville Pride Parade and Pride in the Park Executive Committee. Stacey is a Two-Spirited Métis Trans woman with a strong passion for the betterment of the LGBTQ2S community.

April 2nd, 2019

C1: Locus Steering Committee

9:00am – 10:00am

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

CMHA Kenora Branch embarked on a Quality Improvement initiative in April 2015 with the Kenora District Assertive Community Treatment Team (ACTT) and Forensic Case Management Program and the Dual Diagnosis Program and the Community Mental Health Support Services Case Management (CMHSS) Program from the Kenora Association for Community Living. The intention of this initiative was to utilize the Level of Care Utilization System (LOCUS) instrument to streamline client transitions between the programs and ensure clients were receiving the appropriate level of care they needed.

This presentation will outline the participating programs’ journey using QI and Change Management to create meaningful program changes that were client and family focused.

Presenters:

Cheryl Green and Derek Laffin
CMHA Kenora

Bios:

Cheryl Green has worked in adult mental health as a therapist and team lead since 1990. She is a certified Compassion Fatigue Specialist and Certified EMDR Therapist. 

Derek Laffin has worked for over 30 years in Mental Health developing outreach Case Management Services for the seriously mentally ill for the Dryden Regional Hospital. For the past 18 years Derek has been with CMHA Kenora where he developed an Assertive Community Treatment Team and developed and works as a Forensic Case Manager for the Mental Health Court Program.

C2: Best Evidence Versus Best Interest

9:00am – 10:00am

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs.

Description:

In the real world, the quality of evidence is seldom the primary driver of mental health or addiction services (or the legislation that governs them). Political influence in the form of powerful self-interests create conflicts of interest in health care decision-making. Well-meaning but paternalistic values often war with values of self-determination and equal rights. Financial and professional self-interests are factors that go unacknowledged. To create opportunities for true care and healing we must examine the practical and ideological impediments to getting there, as well as the facilitators of good quality. In this session we will identify hurdles to best evidence-based care and strategies to overcome them.

Presenter:

Jennifer Chambers, Empowerment Council

Bio:

Jennifer Chambers is Executive Director of the Empowerment Council, Systemic Advocates in Addictions and Mental Health. She was a founder of both the Queen Street Patients Council and the Empowerment Council. She negotiated the CAMH Bill of Client Rights and has facilitated the Council’s involvement in numerous inquests and court cases. She is Co-Chair of the Mental Health and Addictions Panel of the Toronto Police Services Board.

C3: Reducing Conflict Amongst Participants with Multiple Presenting Issues within a Low Barrier 24/7 Drop-In

9:00am – 10:00am

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

The workshop will give an overview of Sistering, a low barrier, 24/7 drop-in for marginalized women with lived experience of violence, poverty, homelessness, substance use, and mental health issues.

One of the challenges facing the organization was the level of violent incidences occurring amongst participants in the Drop-In. In 2018, Sistering joined CMHA’s Excellence through Quality Improvement Project (E-QIP) initiative to build its capacity to effectively use data in its efforts to reduce violent incidents. During the workshop, we will review this Quality Improvement (QI) process including: developing a SMART aim statement, identifying root causes of violence and identifying effective QI measures. The presentation will overview key learning from this process, including how to effectively engage staff and participants in the QI process. 

The audience will be asked to provide insights on innovative mental health services that could be offered in the Drop-In for our participants with complex needs in order to improve client outcomes and manage violent behaviours.

Presenters:

Zahra Bolouk and Kimia Ghomeshi
Sistering

Bios:

Zahra Bolouk is currently the Harm Reduction Coordinator at Sistering, who likes to empower marginalized communities. Her prior focus was working with the AIDS Committee of Toronto, supporting women living with HIV. Zahra has a Doctorate Degree in Medicine and a Master’s Degree in Public Health.

Kimia Ghomeshi is an applied research, evaluation, and learning consultant who has worked with Sistering since 2016. She started MKG Consulting Services in 2014, specializing in the intersection of gender, health equity, and immigrant and refugee settlement.

Peer Presenter (TBD)

C4: Taking a Quality Improvement Approach to Ontario’s Quality Standards for Mental Health

9:00am – 10:00am

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

This interactive panel-style presentation will focus on the experiences, successes and challenges of two agencies using a Quality Improvement (QI) approach (lead by E-QIP) to adopt Ontario’s quality standards for schizophrenia care within community mental health services.

Participants will understand how a QI process can be used to recognize local improvement opportunities and facilitate the adoption of the quality standards locally. They will also hear how the application of a QI approach can support increased access to care and increase integration of primary care and substance use services within community mental health programs. Participants will learn how data from sources such as the Ontario Common Assessment of Need (OCAN) can be used to inform adoption of quality standards and measure outcomes.

Presenters:

Frank Sirotich, CMHA Toronto

Michael Dunn, CMHA Ontario

Jennifer Bechtel, CMHA Waterloo Wellington

Jennifer Zosky, OCAN

Laura Daly-Trottier, E-QIP

Bios:

Frank Sirotich is the Director of Research and Evaluation with CMHA Toronto.

Jenna Hitchcox is the Program Manager of E-QIP. She leads the delivery of Foundations to QI program (IDEAS) for Ontario’s community mental health and addictions sector and manages E-QIP’s Community of Practice.

Jennifer Bechtel is the Quality Lead at CMHA Waterloo Wellington.  She is accountable for the organization’s Quality Framework, infrastructure and methodology for QI, increasing QI capacity, strategies, and culture of quality across the organization.

Michael Dunn is the Director of Quality Improvement with CMHA Ontario and co-lead for the Excellence through Quality Improvement Project (E-QIP) supporting QI within the mental health and addictions sector.

Jennifer Zosky is the Provincial Common Assessment Specialist at Community Care Information Management (CCIM). She works with the community mental health sector to improve the quality and use of the Ontario Common Assessment of Need (OCAN).

Laura Daly-Trottier is a Quality Improvement Coach, E-QIP.

D1: Values in Action: Using QI to Promote Values Driven Service Delivery that Transform Organizations and Systems

10:30am – 12:00pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

The Centre for Innovation in Peer Support has had to find ways to influence a shift to genuine person directed care in multiple spheres of impact/influence and be able to measure that.  In order to increase the understanding of the value of peer support, the team is using Quality Improvement (QI) processes to translate their learnings. They will share how they are supporting, validating and influencing change for people engaging in services, staff teams, leaders, organizations and the healthcare system. They will also share the creation and results of their validated Peer Support Integrity, Quality and Impact Survey that tell us about what people are looking for and how it is positively impacting individuals’ lives and their experiences with services. The Centre will explain how the roots of equality and inclusivity are found through engaging the people who “know what it’s like,” and how that can promote values driven service delivery, inform quality improvement, co-create service provision, inform policy change, encourage cultural humility and transform organizations and systems.

Presenters:

Betty-Lou Kristy and Christina Jabalee
Centre for Innovation in Peer Support

Bios:

Christina Jabalee is the co-director for the Centre for Innovation in Peer Support. She brings years of personal, family, peer support and social work experience in the Mental Health and Substance Use/Additions field.

Betty-Lou Kristy is the co-director for the Centre for Innovation in Peer Support. She has spent over a decade as a provincial system-level, lived and family experience – advisor, educator and advocate – helping to frame policy, governance, and programming.

D2: The Evolution of a Walk-In Clinic: Why Everyone Should be Considering the Walk-In Services Model

10:30am – 12:00pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs.

Description:

This presentation will describe Northumberland County’s Community Mental Health Program’s experience with the development, implementation, adaptation outcomes and success stories with our walk-in clinic established in October 2017.  Our journey to the development of the program is a shared experience with other organizations that are challenged with increased demand, acuity, and wait times and no increases in funding. Community organizations passionate about the provision of high-quality mental health and addiction treatment services require innovative and adaptable services to meet client needs. This is especially true with our current climate of lifestyle changes that involves immediate access to information, more informed clients, complexity of lifestyles and pressures to provide services across a continuum of complexity. The walk-in clinic has developed into an adaptable service that has been embraced by clients and community partners.

Presenters:

Carol Beauchamp, Rebound Child & Youth Services Northumberland

Janet Irvine, Northumberland Community Counselling Services

Jennifer Cox, Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences, Northumberland Hill Hospital and Campbellford Memorial Hospital

Bios:

Carol Beauchamp is the Executive Director of Rebound Child & Youth Services Northumberland, an agency that takes a holistic approach to supporting children, youth and their families. She has worked in leadership roles in the corporate and not for profit sectors for over 30 years and for the last ten years has focused on service improvement and impact through cross sectoral collaboration. 

Janet Irvine is the Executive Director for Northumberland Community Counselling Services and has been a partner in the walk-in program since October 2017. Janet has worked as an advocate and educator with children and youth for more than 20 years. 

Jennifer Cox has worked in the field of mental health, counseling, crisis intervention and leadership roles for 20 years. Jennifer’s role is representative of an integrated leadership role with Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences, Northumberland Hills Hospital and Campbellford Memorial Hospital.

D3: Pairing Experience-Based Co-Design (EBCD) and Ontario Common Assessment of Need (OCAN) in Person-Directed Service Planning

10:30am – 12:00pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

The workshop begins with an update on the continued work in the Canadian Mental Health and Addictions sector with the latest development of a province-wide Ontario Common Assessment of Need (OCAN) Network developed with the Excellent through Quality Improvement Project (E-QIP). The Network is made up of eight organizations across the province working on using Experience-Based Co-Design (a QI tool) which actively engages service users in the QI process.  Our goal is to share our collective learning about the use of OCANs in recovery-oriented practice including pain points (for both staff and service users) and specific changes that were implemented as part of the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) process in this QI project.  Participants will have an opportunity to share/discuss their own experiences and to apply learning from the presentations.

Presenters:

Jennifer Zosky, OCAN

Laura Daly-Trottier, E-QIP

Linda Saunders, OCAN Network

Ru Tauro, Oak Centre

Bios:

Jennifer Zosky is a Clinical Assessment Specialist for OCAN. She helps organizations improve quality and use of OCAN information to support client care.

Laura Daly-Trottier is a Quality Improvement Coach, E-QIP.

Linda Saunders is a Quality Improvement Coach for OCAN Network, E-QIP.

Ru Tauro is the Executive Director of Oak Centre, Chair of OCAN Community of Interest (CoI) and a participant in Excellence through Quality Improvement Project (E-QIP).

D4: Developing a Suicide Prevention Strategy Through a Data-Informed Community

10:30am – 12:00pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

The presentation will give participants a hands-on learning experience of how our community developed a life promotion and suicide prevention strategy through the collection of data that has been endorsed by over 100 community partners. Using a multi-sectoral approach, we will share our key learnings in the development of a Suicide Safer Network for the region. This will include an overview of the current state of youth suicide in Northern Ontario, how a steering committee was able to engage youth, community partners, research centres and those with lived experience to collect data, to select an appropriate model and set the foundation for a strategic planning summit with more than 120 community partners.  Participants will learn how the group used a logic model approach to not only collect outcomes and strategies, but also to prioritize them.  Lastly, the presentation will showcase our community’s action plan and discuss how we have maintained the momentum from the summit to sustain multiple working groups, each with their own action plan under the pillars of Leadership, Intervention and Clinical Support, Prevention and Wellness Promotion.

Presenters:

Sue Tasse, CMHA Sudbury/Manitoulin

William Mekers, Child and Family Centre

Bios:

Sue Tasse is the Manager of Clinical Services at CMHA Sudbury/Manitoulin and has a wealth of experience working in the mental health sector. She is also a registered Psychotherapist and since 2016, has held the position of President of the Ontario Association of Consultants, Counsellors, Psychometrists and Psychotherapists.

William Mekers is currently the Research Analyst at the Child and Family Centre and holds a Master of Science Degree and is also pursuing a Master of Business Administration.     

E1: Stop the Bleeding: Overdose Prevention a QI Approach (Design & Implementation)

2:30pm – 3:30pm

Stream:

Responding to the changing substance use landscape in Ontario, including cannabis legalization and the opioid crisis

Description:

Canada is experiencing an overdose epidemic due to an increase of fentanyl-related overdoses. The mortality rate for people with opioid use disorder is more than ten times that of the general population. Despite a number of interventions at CMHA Ottawa, including the uptake of harm reduction supplies and naloxone and deaths related to unintentional overdose continue to increase. This presentation will outline a recent initiative at CMHA Ottawa based on the Health Quality Ontario standards for How to Treat Opioid Use. This approach will develop creative strategies, engage key stakeholders, and establish and track targets.

The use of a Quality Improvement (QI) plan to have an optimal impact will be outlined, as this approach provides a formal framework to prioritize actions and work towards focused targets. Structured interventions across a range of services at CMHA will provide multiple opportunities to address overdose risk and drug-related harms for marginalized people who use drugs.

Presenters:

Annette Bradfield and Todd Bridger
CMHA Ottawa

Bios:

Annette Bradfield has worked as a Nurse Practitioner and Manager at CMHA Ottawa Branch for over ten years. As well as offering direct clinical services to clients, Annette provides leadership for the nursing team and CMHA for various initiatives such as health screening, smoking cessation, harm reduction, and accreditation. She is enthusiastic in sharing project findings with community partners and at conferences.         

Todd Bridger is the Senior Program Manager with CMHA Ottawa responsible for the Housing Outreach for the Homeless, QI and Accreditation. Over 25 years of experience working in Primary Health Care and Mental Health and Addictions. Master’s Degree in Public Administration with advanced training in LEAN Six Sigma, Quality Improvement and Accreditation. Passionate about policy and program analysis to help address healthcare inequities.

E2: Quality Improvements as a Roadmap to Streamlining Intake Process

2:30pm – 3:30pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs.

Description:

This presentation will explore our journey, insights and lessons learned while re-vamping our intake process using a Quality Improvement (QI) approach.  Instead of just blindly following what “others do” and “guesswork” on how we can do better, we took a collaborative approach using QI Science (and E-QIP coaching) to guide the process. The journey has taken us in a completely different direction than we originally assumed. We started this journey reluctantly, believing that the previous overhauls of the program were sufficient and so was our current practice. Once we looked at the actual data and completed a process map, we realized there was room for innovation in our program after all. By using the QI process and collaborative analysis of our intake practices, we were able to identify where we could enhance our efficiencies and eliminate unnecessary processes and ensure we are responsive to client needs.  It took some convincing and data to help the project gain momentum but, in the end, the whole team was on board and excited about the project results and change ideas.

Presenters:

Lana Hastings and Lisa LeBlanc
CMHA Kenora

Bios:

Lisa Leblanc is the Team Lead for the CMHA Kenora Counselling and Treatment Team Lead. Lisa is a Registered Social Worker with a Masters of Social Work Degree.

Lana Hastings works as a Mental Health Therapist on the CMHA Kenora Counselling and Treatment Team.  She is a Registered Social Worker with a Masters of Social Work Degree.

E3: LeaderShift: Developing Leadership and Improving Cross-Sector Collaboration in Community Health

2:30pm – 3:30pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

In an effort to support the development of strong leaders in community health, Ontario’s provincial associations from mental health and addictions, primary care, and home and community support services have partnered with Leads Canada to deliver an innovative and collaborative initiative – LeaderShift. With support from Ontario’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, CMHA Ontario, Addictions and Mental Health Ontario, the Association of Family Health Teams of Ontario, the Alliance for Healthier Communities, and the Ontario Community Support Association have come together to offer in-person, cross-sectoral leadership training sessions, along with a suite of other supportive resources for clinical and administrative leaders in community health.

This project aims to foster linkages within and between community and primary health care organizations; build leadership capability at all levels through cross-sector learning opportunities; encourage leadership renewal as existing leaders prepare to retire; and inspire active leadership in system transformation. This presentation will seek to provide an overview of the project activities undertaken to date, progress made towards the aforementioned goals, preliminary evaluation data from early project participants, and a brief roadmap of upcoming project initiatives.

Presenters:

Adrianna Tetley, Alliance for Healthier Communities

Adrienne Spafford, Addictions and Mental Health Ontario

Camille Quenneville, CMHA Ontario

Deborah Simon, Ontario Community Support Association

Kavita Mehta, Association of Family Health Teams of Ontario

Bios:

Adrianna Tetley is the CEO of the Alliance for Healthier Communities (formerly Association of Ontario Health Centres). She has over 35 years of experience in advocacy, public administration, community development, financial and staff management, policy and board development. Her work in government, the labour movement and several community-based associations has focused on issues related to health care and determinants of health.

Adrienne Spafford is the CEO of Addictions and Mental Health Ontario. She is well-known among Ontario’s health care sector for her commitment to quality and humanity in the delivery of care. Adrienne has held senior positions at the Ontario Long Term Care Association, Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Infrastructure Ontario and with a former Premier of Ontario.   

Deborah Simon has been the CEO of the Ontario Community Support Association since 2012. She is a registered nurse with a Bachelor of Arts from York University and a MBA from Athabasca University. Her role as OCSA CEO draws on decades of clinical, administrative, government relations and leadership experience. Privileged to have had a very diverse career, Deborah has worked across the health care system, but is particularly drawn to the creativity and diversity of the home and community support sector.

Kavita Mehta was South East Toronto Family Health Team’s Executive Director for 9 years. Under her leadership, they were named Family Practice of the Year in 2012 by Ontario College of Family Physicians and a 20 Faces of Change in 2015. Before becoming AFHTO’s CEO, Kavita served on its Board of Directors and became the first non-physician President and Chair in 2012. Before SETFHT, Kavita was a Senior Program Consultant at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Primary Health Care Team.

E4: Re-imagine Waiting: Implementing Quality Improvement to Change the Wait-Time Experience

2:30pm – 3:30pm

Stream:

Improving the quality of mental health or addiction services, including addressing access and client outcomes; using data to drive improvement; and the innovative use of resources to respond to local needs

Description:

Over the past year WoodGreen’s Walk-in Counselling program embarked on a Quality Improvement (QI) project to reduce the wait-time for service. The impact was enlightening. In some instances, wait-times were reduced, but what was more interesting was the shift in how staff, volunteers and service-users perceived and re-imagined the wait-time experience. 

In this workshop, participants will hear about how a community mental health service utilized the principles of QI to reduce the wait-times for service, and the surprising results that arose.  Participants will apply their learnings in the workshop and participate in a mock QI project that will help to re-imagine their own organizational wait-times. This workshop will also allow participants to consider ways to integrate and collaborate with Walk-in Counselling models and service providers into their practice.

Presenters:

Jamie Lemen and Rebecca Heersink
WoodGreen Community Services

Bios:

Jamie Lemen is a seasoned clinician and provides clinical supervision and coordination for the Walk-in Counselling program at WoodGreen Community Services.

Rebecca Heersink is passionate about Quality Improvement with the integration of technology and workflow mapping. Currently she is expanding her QI knowledge by perusing a Masters in Healthcare Quality.